Alternatives to the Present. A Conference on Architecture, Urbanism, Sociology, Development & Planning

Kent State University, Cleveland   

01-02 November 2018 

 Abstracts: 05 June 2018.  Download form

Context:

Alternatives to the Present…… The New Urban Agenda of the United Nations presents itself as a blueprint for governments globally. Through it, UN-Habitat seeks to combine the material, social and environmental agendas molding the urban world. The American Planning Association reflects this, advocating for planning that promotes social equity, inclusive communities, and expanded opportunities for all. The International Union of Architects speaks of revolutionizing design to ensure sustainable human settlement, while the AIA champions livable communities. In the UK, the RIBA links housing design and social inclusion and the National Housing Federation connects the provision of homes to public health. All this reflects the field of sociology and geography with the ISAidentifying cites as the principle site of social conflict and political contestation and the American Association of Geographers linking the notions of resilience and urban justice.

This apparently holistic view suggests that 20th Century top-down and disciplinary reductive understandings of the urban condition, such as those attributed to the Athens Charter, are a thing of the past. It also suggests a scenario in which social equity is fully integrated into notions of development. However, even a cursory glance at the reality of early 21st Century urbanism shows this is clearly not the case. On the one hand, individual disciplines still tend to work in isolation and even in competition, while on the other, Neoliberal agendas still represent the raison d’être of most development projects. The Alternatives to the Present conference seeks to critique the dichotomies involved in this increasingly confused scenario by bringing together various disciplines to interrogate the diversity of factors either limiting or activating the possibilities of an equitable urban future.

Call for Papers: Identities and the Cities: Urban Transformations, Transition and Change in Urban Image Construction

As part of the 7th Euroacademia International Conference
‘Identities and Identifications: Politicized Uses of Collective Identities’
Lucca, Tuscany, Italy, 14 – 15 June 2018

Deadline: 7th of May 2018

Panel Description:

Urban image construction is a reflection, expression and constitutive factor of local identity formation and dynamics. Cities simultaneously localize identities and connect them with wider global signs of utility, function and symbolic order. Elasticity of the label identity accommodates everything that surrounds us as presence or absence, persistence or change. As a theatrical scenery, cities change after each act, sometimes with discrete adaptations, sometimes with radical interventions. If the scenery is composed of streets, parks, roads, museums, monuments, shopping malls and buildings connected through the intricate network of the perpetual and cumulative actions of its inhabitants, every adaptation and intervention affects its multi-dimensional identities. Changes in urban visual identities unfold as a form of public art feeding from the immense potential of social imaginary significations accommodated by a time’s perception of stability, structure and continuity. Urban change is itself a production of meaning, interpretation and identity making practices.

As the chaotic canvases of cities are being stretched over a framework of identity, its further exploration seems more than appropriate. Amidst the incredibly rapid urban growth crowding more than half of the world population in towns and cities, the questions are only going to keep multiplying. How are city identities made and re-made, used and abused, imagined and narrated, politicised and communicated, expressed and projected, imposed and marketed? And above all, how do they thrive within the dynamic interpolation of the nexus of local-global, centre-periphery, urban – suburban, old and new. As out-dated as these dichotomies may sound, in many places their daily life is far from over. As old cities became new capitals and new capitals struggle for more capital, the challenges of maintaining public-driven collective identities in the face of cultural fragmentation and diversification, coupled with consumer-attractiveness is turning them into urban palimpsests. Urban environments reflect the human needs and values. In an increasingly globalized world, the human beings are becoming more citizens of the world than citizens of the cities. The increasing mobility of the new pilgrims of globalization creates more of the same in the logic of universalized urban functionality. Within this logic, the cities are now in the position to re-evaluate their impact on the world and shape their future in a manner that assumes a wider responsibility that evades a localized mentality. Urban local identities are becoming increasingly thin and rely strongly on negotiating a local specificity with universalized functionality and global responsibility. An increasing need for uniqueness and distinctiveness foster site-specificity aimed at placing a particular urban identity within a global economic hierarchy. Public art became essential for affirming distinctive local urban identities in a universe of serialization and commodification.

As the research on cultural identities of the city is becoming more abundant, this panel aims at adopting a wide-lens inter-disciplinary approach, while focusing on various processes affecting identities in the urban context in its global-regional-national-local interplay.

Some example of topics may include (but are not limited to):

•       Collective Memory, Identity and Urban Image Construction
•       Appropriation, Instrumentalisation and Functualisation of Public Spaces
•       Contemporary Nomadism and the City as a Common Denominator for Collective Identities
•       Architecture as ‘Politics with Bricks and Mortar’
•       History, Heritage and Urban Change
•       Urban Regeneration Projects, Landmark Buildings and ‘Starchitects’
•       Non-Places and (Non)Identity
•       Immigrants and the Cultural Identity of Cities
•       City Marketing and City Branding
•       Cities and Public Goods
•       European Capitals of Culture and European Identity
•       Cities and Sites of Memorialisation
•       Identity Creation and the Cultural Offer of the City
•       Urban Cultural Heritage as Identity-Anchor
•       Minor Places: Dominant Culture and Site-Specific Urban Identities
•       Creative Changes of the Cities
•       Art and Industry in Urban Development
•       Urban Aesthetics
•       Urban Installations
•       Critical Architecture
•       Urbanism and Social Intervention: Inclusion of the Marginalized
•       Centre/Periphery Nexuses in Contemporary Urban Development
•       Cities and the Quality of Life
•       Urban Landscapes and Sustainable Cities
•       Contemporary Cities and Environmental Responsibility
•       Ugliness, Kitsch and Value in Shaping Contemporary Urban Spaces
•       Urban Sites of Identification
•       Temporary Urban Interventions
•       Architecture as Public Art

If interested in participating, please read the complete event details on the conference website and apply on-line. Alternatively you can send a maximum 300 words abstract together with the details of your affiliation until 7th of May 2018 by e-mail atapplication@euroacademia.org

For full details of the conference and on-line application please see:
http://euroacademia.eu/conference/7th-identities-and-identifications/

Call for Papers: 2018 ICAHM Annual Meeting, Sicily Discover Sicily’s Argimusco a Holistic Approach to Heritage Management

The 2018 ICOMOS International Scientific Committee for Archaeological Heritage Management (ICAHM) Annual Meeting will focus on the overriding need to develop a holistic and integrated approach to heritage management. The meeting will focus on six key themes that lie at the heart of current debates and concerns relating to different approaches and subjects all of which need to be mainstreamed into to archaeological heritage management. The six themes are: Community Engagement, Climate Change, Tourism, Non-Invasive technologies, Archaeoastronomy, and the Africa Initiative.

Dates: 25 to 28 October 2018
Place: Medieval castle of Montalbano Elicona
Deadline for abstracts: 1 May 2018
http://icahm.icomos.org/2018-icahm-annual-meeting-sicily/
@ICAHMNews, #ICAHM2018
Facebook: ICAHM 2018, Montalbano Elicona, Sicily, Annual Meeting

When All Roads Led to Paris: Artistic Exchanges between France and Central Europe in the 19th Century

CFP: When All Roads Led to Paris: Artistic Exchanges between France and Central Europe in the 19th Century

  • Dates: 01 – 18 Mar, 2018
  • Location: Prague, Czech Republic
  • Website: http://www.cefres.cz/en/7840
  • Deadline for applications: 18 March 2018

Organizers: Kristýna Hochmuth (ÚDU FF UK, NG) and Adéla Klinerová (ÚDU FF UK, EPHE, CEFRES)
Partners: CEFRES, ÚDU FF UK, ÚDU AV ČR, NG
When & Where: 26-27 June 2018, AV ČR, Národní 1009/3, Prague 1, room 205
Languages: French and English

This workshop, organized by CEFRES, the Institute of Art History of the Czech Academy of Sciences (ÚDU AV ČR), the National Gallery in Prague (NG) and the Institute of Art History of the Faculty of Arts of the Charles University (ÚDU FF UK) is open to PhD students, post doctoral students and young researchers. Our discussions will be initiated by a keynote speech by professor Marek Zgórniak, Institute of Art History, Jagiellonian University, Kraków. A complementary program will be open to active participants and public. Travel and accommodation costs will not be covered. On the other hand, we will help with hotel bookings in Prague.

Please send both organizers your paper proposal up to 3,600 characters, in French or English, by 18 March 2018, within the fulfilled application form. The selection committee will contact selected candidates by 20 April 2018. Papers should be no longer than 25 minutes and will be followed by a discussion. A publication is planned.

21st IIWC Symposium – New Horizons, York 2018

Call for Papers

On behalf of the ICOMOS International Wood Committee and ICOMOS-UK we invite papers to be presented at New Horizons, York 2018.

Papers are invited from both ICOMOS members and non-members. To propose a paper, please submit a concise one A4-page abstract as follows:

  • Language: English
  • Abstract length: Maximum 300 words
  • Author’s biography summary: Maximum 100 words
  • At the top of the abstract indicate: the chosen theme/ topic; the title of the paper; and three to five keywords that reflect the general theme of the paper; then
  • Author’s name(s), any institutional affiliation and contact details (postal address, phone, fax, e-mail)
  • If you are an ICOMOS member, your ICOMOS membership number and National Committee.
  • No more than one abstract will be considered per author (unless for the second abstract you are not the principal author).
  • Abstracts should be emailed to:  IIWCYork@gmail.com

Timetable for submission of abstracts and papers:

  • 2 March 2018: Call for Papers:
  • 15 May 2018: Deadline for submission of Abstracts
  • 12 June 2018: Selected speakers notified of their selection
  • 12 -15 September 2018: ‘New Horizons’ – IIWC Symposium York 2018
  • Abstracts sent after the deadline will not be considered.

Selection and Review Process

The Selection Committee will review the abstracts. It will then select abstracts for papers to be presented at the symposium and for publication on the IIWC website (possibly for both). The selected speakers will be invited to submit fully referenced 2,500-word papers with illustrations after the Symposium for publication on the IIWC website. Guidelines for paper presentations will be emailed to the selected presenters.

To facilitate broader discussion of the themes, a further number of abstracts will be selected (and notified) to present posters for display during the Symposium on stands or electronic screens. Poster Presenters may be invited to personally present if a Speaker Presenter drops out unexpectedly.

Selection Committee: Tina Wik ((ICOMOS Sweden), Mikel Landa (ICOMOS Spain), Doug Evans and Maggie Henderson (ICOMOS UK).

Symposium Organising Committee: Doug Evans, IIWC Vice-President (Europe), Tina Wik IIWC General Secretary, Dana Challinor (ICOMOS UK), Susan Denyer Secretary ICOMOS-UK, and Anthea Longo ICOMOS-UK.

EnquiriesIIWCYork@gmail.com

Further information>>

CFP: A World of Architectural History (ARENA)

A World of Architectural History

International Conference to be held at the
Bartlett School of Architecture,
Bartlett Faculty of the Built Environment,
University College London, UK

Friday 2nd – Sunday 4th November 2018

This event is also the 3rd Annual Conference of the Architectural Research in Europe Network Association (ARENA)

Further information about the Conference rationale>>

Call for Papers:

Abstracts of a minimum of 300 words and maximum of 500 words are invited for this major architectural history conference being held at the Bartlett School of Architecture in early-November 2018. Up to three pages of images can also be supplied. However, all of the text/images in each case must be combined together into one single Acrobat PDF file for submission or else will not be accepted.

Applicants should indicate clearly in their abstracts which of the 8 conference themes they wish to be included in (see above for categories). The conference organisers however retain the right to reallocate accepted papers as they see fit.

To ensure equal treatment for all submissions, the organizers will not respond to any individual queries about the content of papers or about the thematic categories.

The selection panel will assess each of the proposed papers on an anonymous basis, and will be comprised of Bartlett Faculty colleagues and members of the International Academic Committee. The deadline for the call for papers is Wednesday 28th March 2018, with decisions being notified by 25th April 2018.

Applicants need to ensure that they have their own sources of funding available to take part in the conference.

Contact:

General enquiries and the PDF files for the proposed papers should be emailed to:
Professor Murray Fraser, Vice-Dean of Research, Bartlett Faculty of the Built Environment, murray.fraser@ucl.ac.uk

Expression of Interest: A Call for AHRC-Funded Research

AHRC-Funded Principal Investigators invite  to contribute a piece on  research projects as part of the ‘case studies’ section of our website.  The aim of this part of our website is to profile current and recently completed AHRC funded research projects and to show the breadth and range of research currently being undertaken on the Heritage Priority Area. AHRC particularly aim to showcase projects which take innovative and creative approaches to heritage and which engage with areas identified as priorities within the AHRC Heritage Research Strategy.

AHRC will only be able to show a selection of work as we aim to have 1-2 new case studies per month, so it will not be able to host all research on our website. However, AHRC will – where possible – tweet all projects who have responded to this call.

The AHRC Heritage Priority Area Leadership team works with the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC), the heritage research community, and heritage partner organisations, to draw together and stimulate the development of a wide range of research across the arts and humanities that makes an important contribution to understanding heritage and key global challenges. AHRC also aim to support the interconnections between research, policy and practice, both in the UK and internationally.

Community Preservation through Adaptive Reuse

Call for Papers

We are excited to announce a call for papers for our cultural and historic preservation conference coming this Fall (October 12-13, 2018). We invite proposals for individual papers as well as complete sessions on the theme “Community Preservation through Adaptive Reuse.” Adaptive reuse is a strategy commonly employed by preservationists, architects, and planners to extend the use-life of historic buildings and sites. Perhaps because it is not as readily measurable as financial benefits, the ability of adaptive reuse to strengthen community relationships and identities is often overlooked. Despite this lack of attention, adaptive reuse has the potential to be a powerful form of place-making that promotes community solidarity.  Taking this perspective, historic buildings and sites are seen as more than fabric. They are also seen as richly layered “texts” that combine material and non-material cultural narratives of a community’s past, present, and even future.  In many cases, the range of narratives associated with a particular building or site is as diverse as the community itself, which has the potential to create a shared sense of history.

The purpose of this conference is to explore adaptive reuse as a form of community preservation.  Potential topics include position papers, conceptualizing adaptive reuse, historical analysis, and case studies. Papers in any field of academic or applied preservation (e.g. architecture, architectural history, archaeology, museum studies, preservation planning/policy) and public history are welcome. Presenters of accepted papers will have conference registration fees waived.

Our keynote speaker will be Jim Lindberg (National Trust for Historic Preservation-Vice President for Research and Policy and former Senior Director of the Preservation Green Lab).

The deadline for submission is May 1, 2018.

Find out more here>>

APT Accepting Abstract Submissions

CALL FOR PAPERS

Submissions for the APT Buffalo Niagara Conference paper presentations and APT Student Scholar abstracts/applications are now being accepted online. Submissions for both are due Monday March 5

Share your insight and cutting-edge ideas
Our audience of industry professionals and craftspeople are committed to maintain, conserve and protect historic structures and sites for future use and appreciation. The paper sessions are a key component in sharing ideas, insights and expanding the dialogue of this important work.

APT Publication
All papers presented will be considered for publication in post-Conference issue of the APT Bulletin. APT reserves the right to publish all accepted abstracts on its websites and with conference registration materials.

Save on Registration
In addition to all of the intellectual and social benefits of attending the world’s premier preservation technologies gathering, you’ll enjoy a reduced registration rate as a speaker (or a full scholarship for Student Scholars).

The four tracks that will explore this year’s theme are:

 

1. Decline vs. revival: tempering the impulse to tear down and start over

2. Materials over time: points of change 

3. For power or for passage: re-envisioning historic industrial and transportation infrastructure

4. This new world: preservation technology and emerging issues within our historic buildings and built landscapes

 

See more information on the tracks by scrolling down on this page.
The journey to Buffalo Niagara starts here!

Architectural History Workshop 2018

  • Dates: 02 – 16 Feb, 2018
  • Location: United Kingdom

Call for Participation

The Society of Architectural Historians of Great Britain (SAHGB) invites proposals for the 2018 Architectural History Workshop. This is our annual event for Postgraduate Students and Early Career Scholars to share and develop their ideas; it aims to provide an informal space away from your own institution where you can discuss, debate, practice and enjoy the company of like-minded researchers working within the history of the built environment, broadly conceived.
We invite participation in a number of ‘lightning’ rounds, where contributors are asked to speak for no more than ten minutes in any appropriate format that engagingly explores and presents your research. This research can be at any stage from a research proposal that you wish to talk about, issues arising from your research, final work as you write-up, post-doctoral reflections, or anything in-between. Speakers from previous events are particularly welcome to update us on the progress of their work.
The event is limited to Postgraduate students (full-time or part-time) and Early Career Scholars (those who have completed their PhDs within the last 5 years). We particularly encourage participation from:
  • Masters students considering doctoral study
  • Doctoral students in relevant disciplines
We are interested in all periods and regions of study, and the full range of methodological approaches to architectural history. The society welcomes submissions of work relating to the history of the built environment from all disciplines, including but by no means limited to:
  • Architecture
  • Art History
  • History (including urban, social and cultural history)
  • Archaeology
  • Anthropology
  • Geography

​On as diverse a range of themes as possible, including:

  • Histories of design
  • Histories of planning
  • Histories of construction
  • Histories of buildings in use
  • Histories of interiors and interior design
  • Histories of practice and professionalism

Alongside presentations, the Workshop will feature a session on ‘Careers in Architectural History’ presented by a panel of invited speakers from museums, heritage bodies, architectural practices, and more. Speakers will be announced in the near future. The keynote speaker will be the Chairman of the SAHGB, Professor Anthony Geraghty (University of York).

If you are interested in making a contribution, please complete the submission formThe closing date for applications is Friday 16 February 2018. The result of all applications will be communicated by Tuesday 20 February, with confirmation from the speakers requested by Thursday 22 February. The Workshop will take place on Saturday 17 March at The Gallery, 70, Cowcross Street, London, EC1M 6EL. No funding is available. A contribution of £10 is requested from all attendees to cover costs (inclusive of all catering).