Monthly Archives: April 2018

Urban Jewish Heritage: Presence and Absence

Final Call for Papers

Urban Jewish Heritage: Presence and Absence
Deadline: 11 May
Website: https://urbanjewishheritageconference.wordpress.com/call-for-papers

For this important Conference in Krakow on Jewish Heritage we have been overwhelmed by expressions of interest from all parts of the world and have already received paper/presentation proposals from 29 countries.

In response to this global interest and to the many researchers and practitioners who still want to participate and share their research and experience with our international and inter-disciplinary audience in the famous City of Krakow, we have agreed to extend the ‘Call for Papers’ for another 4 weeks.

Help to shape our discussions around the past, present and future of urban Jewish Heritage, and join us for what will be an important event in shaping the future for Jewish Heritage across towns and cities around the world. Submit a 300 word abstract for papers/presentations as soon as possible and by 11th May at the very latest.

We are particularly keen to hear from researchers, planners and policy-makers who are working with the following:

·         The role of town, city, and municipality planning and heritage departments in developing management models for urban Jewish heritage

·         Case studies relating to the preservation, conservation, development and interpretation of Jewish heritage in towns and cities

·         Experiences of the tourism industry in running Jewish heritage tours, the touristic presentation of Jewish Heritage in towns and cities, and the touristic experience

·         The role of the museum in promoting, representing and presenting Jewish heritage

·         Intangible heritage relating to the presence and absence of Jewish heritage in urban areas.

If you have any queries or ideas or wish to discuss your involvement in this important event please do not hesitate to contact us: heritageconference@contacts.bham.ac.uk

To submit your 300 word abstract, please do so via our online submission platform: https://universityofbirmingham.submittable.com 

Conference Website: www.urbanjewishheritageconference.wordpress.com

Co-Organised by the Foundation for Jewish Heritage and the Ironbridge International Institute for Cultural Heritage (University of Birmingham).

 

Call for Papers: ‘Smart’ Urban Heritage Management

‘Smart’ Urban Heritage Management Session at the 15th Architectural Humanities Research Association International Conference, 15th – 17th November 2018, Department of the Built Environment, TU Eindhoven.https://www.smartness-discoursepractice.org/smart-urban-heritage-management

The historic fabric which represents a city’s evolution and development is increasingly viewed as a set of assets that enhance the urban experience. These assets can create a sense of place, foster stronger communities, or help define unique identities that boost the urban economy by attracting investment in businesses, urban renewal projects and redevelopment opportunities. However, the unprecedented rise in urbanization trends has placed increased pressures on cities to utilize resources more efficiently, balancing development needs and carbon reduction targets while maintaining some of the historic fabric. It has therefore become imperative to manage heritage assets effectively and sensitively so that these continue to retain value and remain relevant to current and future generations.

This session aims to explore how urban heritage can be managed and maintained in a smart city. The range of questions the session seeks to explore includes, but is not limited to: How might smart technologies inform heritage policy? What smart tools are currently used and how have they assisted in managing urban heritage? How do these tools and technologies connect the intangible values associated with historic fabric to an increasing global population? How can information communication technologies, internet applications and other smart tools be used in view of budgetary constraints? What lessons have been learned and how can they be used to inform urban policy for an increasingly mixed range of pre- and post-1940’s urban fabric?

The call for conference papers is currently open. Please visit  https://www.smartness-discoursepractice.org/call-for-papers/

Deadline for abstract submission is: 1st May 2018, 09:00:00am CET,

We welcome proposals for papers to the session (please click on the title to submit). Paper abstracts must include:

–        name and affiliation of author (and up to one other co-author), with one of the paper (co-)authors being identified as lead contact for the session chair and the organization committee (in the event of two co-authors, at least one must register and attend the conference).

–        Paper title

–        Paper abstract (up to 300 words)

–        A short bio per author of up to 300 words

Urban Summer School: Open Form – call for applications

National Institute of Architecture and Urban Planning announces the call for the summer school “Urban Summer School: Open Form”. We would be grateful if you could share this information on your website and social media channels. Please find attached poster, banner and call for applications pdf you can share.

Urban Summer School: Open Form
When: 26 August – 08 September 2018
Where: Lublin, Warsaw, Szumin
Application deadline: May 7, 2018
Website: www.uss.niaiu.pl
Event on Facebook: https://bit.ly/2JwUOj6

Open Form is a concept that Zofia and Oskar Hansen have placed at the heart of their architectural, artistic and didactic work. According to this theory, architectural substance is the background for social relations, rather that the designer’s goal and an end in itself. The Hansens’ built projects were ahead of their time, in terms of thinking about participatory design, accessible housing, and public spaces. The expression of the Open Form is found in three different projects that will be visited by participants of summer school: osiedle Słowackiego in Lublin, Przyczółek Grochowski in Warsaw, and the architects’ home in Szumin. For ten days, these three locations will become a laboratory of experience and reflection.

Outline of the program, and the school’s principles

Participants in the Urban Summer School will be able to look at the architecture which is currently used by the third generation of inhabitants. From a historical perspective, the position of the Open Form Theory and the Linear Continuous System will be outlined against the background of the ideas of ​​the Modern Movement related to the architecture of housing estates and open areas. The school program is designed as a set of short courses, lectures, workshops and field-work in three theme-based studios. The structure of the school will be determined by the scales, which the designers themselves have used: micro, meso and macroscale. They will be translated into the perspective of a flat, a housing estate, and a housing cooperative. Working language is English.

Eligibility Criteria

We welcome students, researchers and young professionals operating in the fields of architecture, urban planning, art and design, as well as representatives of other areas of humanities (history, sociology, fine arts, anthropology, and more). Participation in the school is free of charge. Organizers will cover travel expenses (up to 200 eur), accommodation and catering for the participants.

Contact
For more details feel free to contact the program coordinator Kacper Kępiński at k.kepinski@niaiu.pl

Alternatives to the Present. A Conference on Architecture, Urbanism, Sociology, Development & Planning

Kent State University, Cleveland   

01-02 November 2018 

 Abstracts: 05 June 2018.  Download form

Context:

Alternatives to the Present…… The New Urban Agenda of the United Nations presents itself as a blueprint for governments globally. Through it, UN-Habitat seeks to combine the material, social and environmental agendas molding the urban world. The American Planning Association reflects this, advocating for planning that promotes social equity, inclusive communities, and expanded opportunities for all. The International Union of Architects speaks of revolutionizing design to ensure sustainable human settlement, while the AIA champions livable communities. In the UK, the RIBA links housing design and social inclusion and the National Housing Federation connects the provision of homes to public health. All this reflects the field of sociology and geography with the ISAidentifying cites as the principle site of social conflict and political contestation and the American Association of Geographers linking the notions of resilience and urban justice.

This apparently holistic view suggests that 20th Century top-down and disciplinary reductive understandings of the urban condition, such as those attributed to the Athens Charter, are a thing of the past. It also suggests a scenario in which social equity is fully integrated into notions of development. However, even a cursory glance at the reality of early 21st Century urbanism shows this is clearly not the case. On the one hand, individual disciplines still tend to work in isolation and even in competition, while on the other, Neoliberal agendas still represent the raison d’être of most development projects. The Alternatives to the Present conference seeks to critique the dichotomies involved in this increasingly confused scenario by bringing together various disciplines to interrogate the diversity of factors either limiting or activating the possibilities of an equitable urban future.

Call for Papers: Identities and the Cities: Urban Transformations, Transition and Change in Urban Image Construction

As part of the 7th Euroacademia International Conference
‘Identities and Identifications: Politicized Uses of Collective Identities’
Lucca, Tuscany, Italy, 14 – 15 June 2018

Deadline: 7th of May 2018

Panel Description:

Urban image construction is a reflection, expression and constitutive factor of local identity formation and dynamics. Cities simultaneously localize identities and connect them with wider global signs of utility, function and symbolic order. Elasticity of the label identity accommodates everything that surrounds us as presence or absence, persistence or change. As a theatrical scenery, cities change after each act, sometimes with discrete adaptations, sometimes with radical interventions. If the scenery is composed of streets, parks, roads, museums, monuments, shopping malls and buildings connected through the intricate network of the perpetual and cumulative actions of its inhabitants, every adaptation and intervention affects its multi-dimensional identities. Changes in urban visual identities unfold as a form of public art feeding from the immense potential of social imaginary significations accommodated by a time’s perception of stability, structure and continuity. Urban change is itself a production of meaning, interpretation and identity making practices.

As the chaotic canvases of cities are being stretched over a framework of identity, its further exploration seems more than appropriate. Amidst the incredibly rapid urban growth crowding more than half of the world population in towns and cities, the questions are only going to keep multiplying. How are city identities made and re-made, used and abused, imagined and narrated, politicised and communicated, expressed and projected, imposed and marketed? And above all, how do they thrive within the dynamic interpolation of the nexus of local-global, centre-periphery, urban – suburban, old and new. As out-dated as these dichotomies may sound, in many places their daily life is far from over. As old cities became new capitals and new capitals struggle for more capital, the challenges of maintaining public-driven collective identities in the face of cultural fragmentation and diversification, coupled with consumer-attractiveness is turning them into urban palimpsests. Urban environments reflect the human needs and values. In an increasingly globalized world, the human beings are becoming more citizens of the world than citizens of the cities. The increasing mobility of the new pilgrims of globalization creates more of the same in the logic of universalized urban functionality. Within this logic, the cities are now in the position to re-evaluate their impact on the world and shape their future in a manner that assumes a wider responsibility that evades a localized mentality. Urban local identities are becoming increasingly thin and rely strongly on negotiating a local specificity with universalized functionality and global responsibility. An increasing need for uniqueness and distinctiveness foster site-specificity aimed at placing a particular urban identity within a global economic hierarchy. Public art became essential for affirming distinctive local urban identities in a universe of serialization and commodification.

As the research on cultural identities of the city is becoming more abundant, this panel aims at adopting a wide-lens inter-disciplinary approach, while focusing on various processes affecting identities in the urban context in its global-regional-national-local interplay.

Some example of topics may include (but are not limited to):

•       Collective Memory, Identity and Urban Image Construction
•       Appropriation, Instrumentalisation and Functualisation of Public Spaces
•       Contemporary Nomadism and the City as a Common Denominator for Collective Identities
•       Architecture as ‘Politics with Bricks and Mortar’
•       History, Heritage and Urban Change
•       Urban Regeneration Projects, Landmark Buildings and ‘Starchitects’
•       Non-Places and (Non)Identity
•       Immigrants and the Cultural Identity of Cities
•       City Marketing and City Branding
•       Cities and Public Goods
•       European Capitals of Culture and European Identity
•       Cities and Sites of Memorialisation
•       Identity Creation and the Cultural Offer of the City
•       Urban Cultural Heritage as Identity-Anchor
•       Minor Places: Dominant Culture and Site-Specific Urban Identities
•       Creative Changes of the Cities
•       Art and Industry in Urban Development
•       Urban Aesthetics
•       Urban Installations
•       Critical Architecture
•       Urbanism and Social Intervention: Inclusion of the Marginalized
•       Centre/Periphery Nexuses in Contemporary Urban Development
•       Cities and the Quality of Life
•       Urban Landscapes and Sustainable Cities
•       Contemporary Cities and Environmental Responsibility
•       Ugliness, Kitsch and Value in Shaping Contemporary Urban Spaces
•       Urban Sites of Identification
•       Temporary Urban Interventions
•       Architecture as Public Art

If interested in participating, please read the complete event details on the conference website and apply on-line. Alternatively you can send a maximum 300 words abstract together with the details of your affiliation until 7th of May 2018 by e-mail atapplication@euroacademia.org

For full details of the conference and on-line application please see:
http://euroacademia.eu/conference/7th-identities-and-identifications/

Call for Papers: 2018 ICAHM Annual Meeting, Sicily Discover Sicily’s Argimusco a Holistic Approach to Heritage Management

The 2018 ICOMOS International Scientific Committee for Archaeological Heritage Management (ICAHM) Annual Meeting will focus on the overriding need to develop a holistic and integrated approach to heritage management. The meeting will focus on six key themes that lie at the heart of current debates and concerns relating to different approaches and subjects all of which need to be mainstreamed into to archaeological heritage management. The six themes are: Community Engagement, Climate Change, Tourism, Non-Invasive technologies, Archaeoastronomy, and the Africa Initiative.

Dates: 25 to 28 October 2018
Place: Medieval castle of Montalbano Elicona
Deadline for abstracts: 1 May 2018
http://icahm.icomos.org/2018-icahm-annual-meeting-sicily/
@ICAHMNews, #ICAHM2018
Facebook: ICAHM 2018, Montalbano Elicona, Sicily, Annual Meeting