Category Archives: Uncategorized

Community Preservation through Adaptive Reuse

Call for Papers

We are excited to announce a call for papers for our cultural and historic preservation conference coming this Fall (October 12-13, 2018). We invite proposals for individual papers as well as complete sessions on the theme “Community Preservation through Adaptive Reuse.” Adaptive reuse is a strategy commonly employed by preservationists, architects, and planners to extend the use-life of historic buildings and sites. Perhaps because it is not as readily measurable as financial benefits, the ability of adaptive reuse to strengthen community relationships and identities is often overlooked. Despite this lack of attention, adaptive reuse has the potential to be a powerful form of place-making that promotes community solidarity.  Taking this perspective, historic buildings and sites are seen as more than fabric. They are also seen as richly layered “texts” that combine material and non-material cultural narratives of a community’s past, present, and even future.  In many cases, the range of narratives associated with a particular building or site is as diverse as the community itself, which has the potential to create a shared sense of history.

The purpose of this conference is to explore adaptive reuse as a form of community preservation.  Potential topics include position papers, conceptualizing adaptive reuse, historical analysis, and case studies. Papers in any field of academic or applied preservation (e.g. architecture, architectural history, archaeology, museum studies, preservation planning/policy) and public history are welcome. Presenters of accepted papers will have conference registration fees waived.

Our keynote speaker will be Jim Lindberg (National Trust for Historic Preservation-Vice President for Research and Policy and former Senior Director of the Preservation Green Lab).

The deadline for submission is May 1, 2018.

Find out more here>>

APT Accepting Abstract Submissions

CALL FOR PAPERS

Submissions for the APT Buffalo Niagara Conference paper presentations and APT Student Scholar abstracts/applications are now being accepted online. Submissions for both are due Monday March 5

Share your insight and cutting-edge ideas
Our audience of industry professionals and craftspeople are committed to maintain, conserve and protect historic structures and sites for future use and appreciation. The paper sessions are a key component in sharing ideas, insights and expanding the dialogue of this important work.

APT Publication
All papers presented will be considered for publication in post-Conference issue of the APT Bulletin. APT reserves the right to publish all accepted abstracts on its websites and with conference registration materials.

Save on Registration
In addition to all of the intellectual and social benefits of attending the world’s premier preservation technologies gathering, you’ll enjoy a reduced registration rate as a speaker (or a full scholarship for Student Scholars).

The four tracks that will explore this year’s theme are:

 

1. Decline vs. revival: tempering the impulse to tear down and start over

2. Materials over time: points of change 

3. For power or for passage: re-envisioning historic industrial and transportation infrastructure

4. This new world: preservation technology and emerging issues within our historic buildings and built landscapes

 

See more information on the tracks by scrolling down on this page.
The journey to Buffalo Niagara starts here!

Architectural History Workshop 2018

  • Dates: 02 – 16 Feb, 2018
  • Location: United Kingdom

Call for Participation

The Society of Architectural Historians of Great Britain (SAHGB) invites proposals for the 2018 Architectural History Workshop. This is our annual event for Postgraduate Students and Early Career Scholars to share and develop their ideas; it aims to provide an informal space away from your own institution where you can discuss, debate, practice and enjoy the company of like-minded researchers working within the history of the built environment, broadly conceived.
We invite participation in a number of ‘lightning’ rounds, where contributors are asked to speak for no more than ten minutes in any appropriate format that engagingly explores and presents your research. This research can be at any stage from a research proposal that you wish to talk about, issues arising from your research, final work as you write-up, post-doctoral reflections, or anything in-between. Speakers from previous events are particularly welcome to update us on the progress of their work.
The event is limited to Postgraduate students (full-time or part-time) and Early Career Scholars (those who have completed their PhDs within the last 5 years). We particularly encourage participation from:
  • Masters students considering doctoral study
  • Doctoral students in relevant disciplines
We are interested in all periods and regions of study, and the full range of methodological approaches to architectural history. The society welcomes submissions of work relating to the history of the built environment from all disciplines, including but by no means limited to:
  • Architecture
  • Art History
  • History (including urban, social and cultural history)
  • Archaeology
  • Anthropology
  • Geography

​On as diverse a range of themes as possible, including:

  • Histories of design
  • Histories of planning
  • Histories of construction
  • Histories of buildings in use
  • Histories of interiors and interior design
  • Histories of practice and professionalism

Alongside presentations, the Workshop will feature a session on ‘Careers in Architectural History’ presented by a panel of invited speakers from museums, heritage bodies, architectural practices, and more. Speakers will be announced in the near future. The keynote speaker will be the Chairman of the SAHGB, Professor Anthony Geraghty (University of York).

If you are interested in making a contribution, please complete the submission formThe closing date for applications is Friday 16 February 2018. The result of all applications will be communicated by Tuesday 20 February, with confirmation from the speakers requested by Thursday 22 February. The Workshop will take place on Saturday 17 March at The Gallery, 70, Cowcross Street, London, EC1M 6EL. No funding is available. A contribution of £10 is requested from all attendees to cover costs (inclusive of all catering).

Visual Heritage 2018, Vienna, Austria – Call for Papers & Posters

DIGITIZE: RESEARCH – RECORD – REACTIVATE – RECONSTRUCT
Visual Heritage 2018 hosted by CHNT 23 2018
(Vienna, Austria – November 12 – 15, 2018)

The next edition of CHNT (Cultural Heritage and New Technologies – www.chnt.at) will be organized in cooperation with the EG GCH (Eurographics Symposium and Graphics Cultural Heritage) in the City Hall of Vienna Austria.

The aim of this federated event is again to bring different communities in the same venue, to share experiences and discuss methodologies concerning digital visual media and their use in the context of heritage applications, to document digitally on at-risk archaeological sites, historical buildings, museums… and their texts, books, paints, pictures, objects …all records of through collecting original image collection’s source.

The 2018 edition will be a special event, since 2018 has been declared by the European Commission the “European Year of Cultural Heritage”. The event will also take place during the Austrian Presidency of the Council of the European Union, at 2nd half of 2018.
Therefore, Visual Heritage 2018 will be an ideal context for discussing European policies on digital heritage and digital humanities.

CALL for SESSIONS, PANELS, ROUND TABLES, WORKSHOPS and ADVANCED ARCHAEOLOGICAL TRAININGS
We invite everybody to send us your proposals to organize a session, panel, workshop, round table, tutorial or advanced archaeological training.
Content of the proposal
• Title of the session, ….
• Name of chairs / organizer (max. 2)
• Description of the planned session,… (200 – 300 words)
• Target group
• Specifics

For more questions, email at Wolfgang.boerner@stadtarchaeologie.at

Please send your proposal to: kongrarchae@stadtarchaeologie.at

 

Urbanism at borders

Interdisciplinary Global Workshop for Research Network

Robert Gordon University is proud to be hosting the inaugural Interdisciplinary Global Workshop from Wednesday 5 to Saturday 8 September 2018. The event will take place at our Garthdee Campus, on the banks of the River Dee.

Border research emphases on the discourse analysis on critical issues and connotation of separation – demarcation – segregation and conflicts and translated and theorizing these issues in various patterns of urbanism. Borders determine the degree of how regions are positioned in the global maps with the condition with which regions are valued, categorised and marked by its capacity to create individual geographical identities and unique settlement patterns. Borders define socially and economically incompatible systems that influence the nature of mobility of goods, human traffic, and economic transactions that suggest temporal, subdued, blurring socio-cultural entities defined by urban orders. Borders create these blurring urban orders along its boundaries defined by lack of cohesiveness with either sides of a border.

Borders are more than geographically defined separations, but accounts of metamorphoses and metaphors that two neighbouring states are defined by the economy, politics, culture, and religion – manifested by its typological entities.

Mapping Borders reflecting on the following issues:

  • Characteristics of social displacement at the borders
  • Transient/temporal settlement
  • Typologies and Form of Settlement
  • Conflict and Cultural hybridity
  • The architecture of weak forms on borderlines
  • Regenerative architecture as a socio-cultural policy
  • A phenomenology of generic places
  • Borders invoke centres: is there a new foundation?
  • The occupation of place: between reality and authorities
  • Crisis communication and the ‘architecture’ of media
  • Quick solutions: the printed habitat
  • New Social formation/Social Capital

Borders Research Scopes

  • Collaborative research initiation among partnering countries – Intermediate actions
  • Collaborative thematic conferences – September 2018
  • Publication as monographs – post conference monograph with Springer
  • Filming and documentation – part of conference submission
  • Design charrette – school-level masters design studio projects

The deadline for abstracts is Tuesday 30 January 2018. Send abstract by email or post on or before to:

Helen Aggasild
Scott Sutherland School of Architecture & Built Environment
Robert Gordon University
Sir Ian Wood Building,
Garthdee Road,
Aberdeen,
AB10 7GJ,

To find out more click here>>

Call for Papers: TANGIBLE – INTANGIBLE HERITAGE(S)

TANGIBLE – INTANGIBLE HERITAGE(S) – DESIGN, SOCIAL AND CULTURAL CRITIQUES ON THE PAST, PRESENT AND THE FUTURE

Place: University of East London

Dates: 14 – 15 June 2018

Abstracts: 01 April 2018

Abstract Submission Form

Early Abstracts reviewed on a rolling basis from 01 Jan 2018. This allows international delegates time to arrange travel plans.

 

This conference calls upon art and architectural historians, sociologists, cultural theoristsarchitectsplannersurban designers, to critique the urban conditions of the past with a view to informing the present.

Sample of themes: contemporary architecture and modes of production |  emerging forms in city planning  |  social and political history of urbanisation  globally |  representations of ‘the city’ in art  |  historic architecture as social text

Context:

In a time when the construction of New Towns is on the agenda in UK; when climate change threatens historic cities and landscapes in Asia; when the cultural industries turn our art and architectural history into economic models of development; when entire cities are being built from scratch across rural China; and socio-economic change is destroying industrial communities leaving people in the West in search for answers from politicians like of Donald Trump, what can we mean by ‘heritage’?

Our built environment of buildings, towns, cities and infrastructures are always, at inception, visions of a future. They also become – very quickly – the markings of the past. Framed as architectural history, these markings tend to be what we think of when discussing heritage. However, heritage is more than this. It is equally a question of artistic and media representations of the present and the past; the social milieus we destroy or reinforce as economies fade or grow; the societies we construct through varying forms of city governance; the artistic and political legacies we use as points of rupture in building the future.

Our buildings, towns, cities and their artistic and media representations then, are all visions of an aesthetic present. They are the realisation through design of what we can and wish to build. They are social constructions defining the way people live, think, develop and desire. They are economic contrivances marking out the interests of capital. They are expressions of knowledge and skills which can inform innovation. They are phenomena mediated equally by the arts, medias and actual experience. They are inevitably political at every level.

This conference suggests we cannot think of heritage in reductive terms, neither as isolated objects or images nor as a purely historic phenomenon. The decisions we take about this ‘heritage’ today are not only based on the past, they will inform the future.

 

Themes:

In redefining heritage as a historic, artistic, design, media, social, political, and economic issue, this conference attempts to open up the concept to a reading that is interdisciplinary. In questioning these relationships over time, it seeks to understand the past in light of the present and identify creative ways of operating in a globalised future.

Within this framework, the conference welcomes international specialists who will ask their own questions about history and the present, and thus help redefine the perspective of others: artarchitectural and social historianscultural theorists, architectsplanners and urban designers. Examples of questions we expect to be asked include, but are not limited to:

What role did and will art and design economies have on city development? How do the arts and the media create and distort our vision of built and social urban heritage? How have and can we preserve the architecture of the past while building for the present? What happens to community and social bonds when cities are replanned? How do changing economic conditions alter how we build and live in cities? How has craftmanship and knowledge typically informed contemporary modes of production and work through innovative processes…..

 

Disciplines:

We seek to explore definitions of ‘heritage’ by considering it from various angles: physical form, artistic formulation, political tool, social and media construct, economic reification and digital innovation. As a result, the conference welcomes presentations from specialists from multiple fields whose work overlaps with issues of heritage broadly defined: art historians, conservationists, architects, urban designers, cultural theorists, sociologists, artists, media and press historians, planners and more.

In this regard the event follows the expressly interdisciplinary dialogue set out by AMPS and the research and publication programme PARADE (Publication & Research in Art, Architectures, Design and Environments).

Find out more here…

CALL FOR PAPER: SAH Conference ‘RITUAL AND ORNAMENT’

American Association for Italian Studies

  • Dates: 14 – 17 Jun, 2018
  • Location: Sorrento, Vermont, United States
  • Address: Sant’Anna Institute
  • Contact: Eleanor DAponte
  • Email: edapont@norwich.edu

The American Association for Italian Studies is now accepting session and roundtable proposals for their next conference, which will take place from 14-17 June 2018 at the Sant’Anna Institute in Sorrento, Italy.

 76. Title: RITUAL AND ORNAMENT

The genesis of architectural ornament derives from ritual and a human instinct for imitation (Gottfried Semper, 2004). Early architectural ‘enclosures’, or ‘space dividers’ were first plant fiber woven mats and then woven tapestries. Woven patterns used as edging for Roman tapestry walls are replicated in Pompeiian fresco designs. The ritual uses of tapestries and relics in religious ceremonies of the Sorrentine peninsula are memorialized and transformed as decorative and structural motifs on walls, in mosaics, liturgical elements, and building facades.  Interdisciplinary papers exploring the relationship of ornament to ritual and sacrament from ancient to modern times are welcome.

Proposals due to edapont@norwich.edu by December 30, 2017 should include title, brief abstract (200-250 words), and short biographical blurb.

Chair: Eleanor D’Aponte, AIA, Associate Professor, Norwich University, edapont@norwich.edu

4th International SEAHA Conference

The 4th International Conference on Science and Engineering in Arts, Heritage and Archaeology (SEAHA) will be hosted by the Institute for Sustainable Heritage, University College London, 4-6 June 2018. Details regarding the conference can be found here.

The Call for Abstracts is now open and the deadline is on 22nd January 2018. We would like to invite you to submit your abstracts for oral and/or posters presentations that signify the best science presented in an accessible manner to a broad audience. Please submit your abstracts by completing the Abstract Submission Form here:  http://bit.ly/2AIh608.

The SEAHA conference series aims to engage with high-quality interdisciplinary scientific research of cultural heritage. Based on the success of the past three events, the series established a platform for open dialogue between academics, professionals, practitioners, entrepreneurs and policy-makers from around the globe.

The 4th SEAHA conference will continue to examine the opportunities and challenges confronting heritage science. In doing so, we would like to showcase collaboration with industry in particular and deepen the interdisciplinarity by engaging with high-profile academics and professionals from a broad range of expertise. It is our great pleasure to announce the invited speakers:

  • Prof. May Cassar

Professor of Sustainable Heritage, Director of Institute for Sustainable Heritage, University College London, UK.

Proposed topic: Job creation in heritage science

  • Prof. Mathew Collins

Niels Bohr Professor of Palaeoproteomics, University of Copenhagen, Denmark.

Professor of Archaeology, University of York, UK.

Proposed topic: Bioarchaeology

  •  Edonis Jesus

BIM leader, Lendlease, UK.

Founder and chairwoman of BIM4Heritage, UK.

Proposed topic: BIM for cultural heritage

  •  Chris Jones

Head of Department, Natural History Museum, Core Research Laboratories, UK.

Proposed topic: Science and natural history collections

  •  Prof. Chris Lintott

Professor of Astrophysics, Department of Physics, Oxford University, UK.

Principal Investigator of Zooniverse.

Proposed topic: Citizen science and crowd sourcing 

  • Nicola Masini

Senior Research Scientist, National Research Council (CNR) – Institute for Archaeological and Monumental Heritage (IBAM), Italy.

Proposed topic: Use of spatial technologies in surveying and monitoring cultural heritage 

  • Andrew Miller

Former MP for Ellesmere Port & Neston, UK.

Royal Society’s Science Policy Advisory Group, UK.

Proposed topic: Science and policy 

  • Prof. Sofia Olhede

Professor of Statistics, Honorary Professor of Computer Science, senior research associate of Mathematics, Director of UCL Centre for Data Science, University College London, UK.

Proposed topic: Big data in heritage science 

  • Luca Pezzati

Senior researcher, National Institute for Optics of the National Research Council (INO-CNR), Italy.

Coordinator of E-RIHS, the European Research Infrastructure for Heritage Science.

Proposed topic: International research infrastructure for heritage science

Please contact the conference organising committee at events@seaha-cdt.ac.uk for queries and comments.

HERITAGE for PLANET EARTH 2018

20th International Assembly and Symposium of the Romualdo Del Bianco Foundation,
“HERITAGE for PLANET EARTH 2018”, 3-4 March 2018

INVITATION and CALL FOR ABSTRACT

The Fondazione Romualdo Del Bianco and its International Institute Life Beyond Tourism® are pleased to inform and invite you to the Symposium HERITAGE for PLANET EARTH 2018, to be held during the 20th International Assembly of the Romualdo Del Bianco Foundation, in Florence (Italy), on 3-4 March 2018.

Following the successful approach and international resonance of the previous 19th edition 11-12 March 2017(*), the 2018 edition of “Heritage for Planet Earth” Symposium presents 3 different sessions:

  1. Tourism market trends : to manage or to be managed
  2. Digital technologies: saving identity or feeding globalization?
  3. Smart city and heritage conservation by means of modern building technologies

We believe that World Heritage Sites represent a great strategy for getting people of different cultures together and for exercising dialogue among numerous cultures, so the symposium is aimed is to open a platform where to get together THEORY & PRACTICE in order to contribute to the development of dialogue among cultures under the main topic Heritage for Intercultural Dialogue on the Planet we all share.

For your participation,  you will find the Call for Abstract with further details and orientation or apply to secretarygeneral@fondazione-delbianco.org.

Timelines:

  • 15th December 2017: abstract submission
  • 15th January 2018: notification of the abstracts acceptance on the conference webpage
  • 20th February 2018: final papers submission for ISBN e-book conference proceedings)

Urban Jewish Heritage: Presence and Absence

Over the centuries, cities across Europe and around the world have been impacted by their Jewish communities; as places of both presence and absence. The touristic presentation of Jewish heritage in many cities belies long and difficult histories but nevertheless recognition through the protection, conservation and interpretation of this heritage is of increasing importance. However, within their wider context of urban heritage, many sites and narratives of former, and existing, Jewish communities face a number of issues that require deeper examination and policy/practical responses.
Being held as part of the European Year of Cultural Heritage, this Conference is dedicated to
addressing Urban Jewish Heritage and the multi-layered issues it faces. Its aim is to examine, discuss and explore pasts, presents and futures for cities and towns with Jewish heritage. The Conference recognises that the threats to Jewish heritage are complex and dynamic and there is a need to identify new thinking to preserve and sustainably manage both the tangible and intangible aspects of Jewish culture and to communicate this to a wider audience. In doing so, it seeks to address the following indicative questions:

• What are the pressures upon Jewish heritage in the urban context and what levels of
protection and conservation are in place to deal with such pressures?
• How can new and sensitive uses be found for Jewish heritage in towns and cities?
• What management models can be applied to Jewish heritage to ensure its sustainability?
• What forms of relationships exist between Jewish heritage sites and urban tourism?
• What are the touristic experiences with Jewish heritage?
• To what extent is the interpretation of Jewish heritage effective and geared to an increasingly cosmopolitan and younger audience?
• What is the role of the museum in the mediation and representation of Jewish heritage?
• How is the intangible cultural heritage of the Jewish community communicated?

Held in the World Heritage City of Krakow in Poland, which demonstrates both the potential and the challenges involved with its own extensive Jewish heritage, the Conference will bring together academics, managers, planners, policy makers and community leaders to address the above questions and more. The Conference is designed to encourage provocative, creative and constructive dialogue across different sectors and different disciplines and will feature case studies and best practice. Thus we welcome papers from those working in heritage conservation, planning, policy, management, interpretation, museums and tourism and from academic colleagues in fields such as anthropology, archaeology, architecture, business, heritage, history, geography, sociology and urban studies.

Please provide a 300 word abstract of your intended paper/presentation no later than 9th April 2018 via our online submission platform: www.universityofbirmingham.submittable.com
Enquiries: heritageconference@contacts.bham.ac.uk